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OUR AWARDS


2015 Land Steward of the Year

The Land Trust of Virginia awarded the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club the 2015 Land Steward of the Year Award for its continued conservation of Virginia lands. PATC President Dick Hostelley accepted the award at LTV’s annual Garden Party at Lee Hall in The Plains, Virginia. Since 2004, LTV and PATC partnered to protect 743 acres of land in four tracts: Meadows Cabin, Blackburn, Entry Run, and Vining.

The 95-acre Meadows Cabin is located near Syria, Madison County, Virginia. Blackburn is 145 acres near Round Hill, Loudoun County, Virginia. The 234-acre Entry Run and the 249-acre Vining are near Stanardsville, Greene County, Virginia. The four tracts are permanently protected by conservation easements donated to LTV. Donation of easements generates Virginia Land Preservation Tax Credits which can be sold to facilitate acquisition and protection of additional properties. Shaver Hollow, another 65-acre PATC property near Shenandoah National Park headquarters, was subsequently acquired and protected in this manner. Property acquisition and protection is one method PATC uses to preserve open spaces, viewsheds, and trail-related amenities for use by hikers.

 
2009 Hartzog Award

The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club was recognized as an outstanding partner of Shenandoah National Park and the National Park Service. Shenandoah National Park Deputy Superintendent Jennifer Flynn presented PATC the prestigious 2009 National Park Service George and Helen Hartzog group award for the Northeast Region.
 
Donating nearly 25,000 hours of volunteer time, the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club partnership accomplishments in 2009 contributed substantially to the conservation, preservation, and protection of valuable park resources, designated wilderness and visitor experiences in Shenandoah National Park. Using extensive volunteer resources and funding, the PATC supports the park by helping to maintain 300 miles of park trails, including 100 miles of the Appalachian Trail; performing recurring maintenance on more than a dozen historic backcountry structures; conducting volunteer trail patrols; educating the public about Leave No Trace ethics and the meaning of wilderness; and protecting public trail access along the park boundary.
 
Much of PATC’s support is immeasurable and intangible to the park, but an estimate of cash and in-kind value of services to the park in just one fiscal year exceeded $500,000.