PATC Books

 
Picture of the productBreaking Trail in the Central Appalachians
$15.84 for members, $19.80 for non-members. In November 22, 1927, six men (Avery, Ricker, Schmeckebier, Schairer, Corson and Anderson) gather to form a new club. Their job - to build the Appalachian Trail from Pine Grove Furnace in Pennsylvania to Rockfish Gap in Virginia. But as PATC member and author Dave Bates points out, that is not all they did. PATC scouted, designed, selected and in some cases built, the entire Appalachian Trail all the way from Delaware Water Gap in New Jersey to Springer Mountain in Georgia, plus the trail through Maine. And because of Myron Avery's dominant personality, president of PATC and chairman of the Appalachian Trail Conference at the same time, PATC became ATC, and ATC became PATC. This is the early history of the club that build the Trail. Bates has recaptured the enthusiasm, the energy, the passion of those early trail builders. Liberally illustrated with old photos, it takes you back to the 1920s and 1930s, when the AT was just a series of paint blazes in the wilderness.

Regular price: 19.80
Discounted member price: 15.84
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PC210
Picture of the productLost Trails and Forgotten People: The Story of Jones Mtn.
$8.00 for members, $10.00 for non-members. Tom Floyd was one of the hikers in the 1960s who heard that a trail used to cross Jones Mountain. One day, while hiking near the Laurel Gap, he was warned by another hiker to stay off the mountain because it was wild and people had gotten lost. In the early 1970s, the author was one of the hikers on the Appalachian Trail who heard that a cabin had been discovered on Jones Mountain. Floyd first visited the mountain in 1976. That year, as the supervisor of trails for the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, he designed and helped build the trail to Bear Church Rock. On his work trips to the mountain, he was intrigued by the old trails and roads that he occasionally came across. While exploring old traces near Cat Knob, he discovered faint blue blazes on trees, evidence of a trail-building era that he had not heard about. Then one night during a work trip, when all the sleeping spaces were taken at the Jones Mountain Cabin, Floyd climbed to a flat above the hollow, where he slept on the ground. The next morning, he awoke to discover two fieldstones marking a grave just a few feet from where he had slept. These events fed his curiosity and eventually led him to explore the mountain further and research its history. What started as a feature article soon became a book. Jones Mountain and the adjacent ridges and valleys are rich in history, part of the great drama that has molded the American continent. Here, the story of human events spans more than 250 years of recorded time, from the first settlements of the 1720s to a trail-building era of the 1970s. Before the arrival of the Europeans, Indians occupied the Blue Ridge for 12,000 years. Most of Jones Mountain is today in Shenandoah National Park. In its remote valleys and wild backcountry are some forty old trails and traces. There are two sites of prehistoric Indian camps, more than twenty former homesites, old cemeteries, several distillery works, two old mill sites, four abandoned narrow-gauge railroad lines, old logging roads, former pasturelands and cultivated fields now grown over, and the site of a military encampment. This book is the story of the mountain and the people who lived there, left their mark, and died there. The new edition (2004) corrects and updates the information based on subsequent interviews and adds an historic photograph.

Regular price: 10.00
Discounted member price: 8.00
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PC230
Picture of the productThe Dean Mountain Story
$8.00 for members, $10.00 for non-members. The Dean Mountain Story began in England in the mid-1750s when two brothers, John and William Deane, boarded a Dutch ship and sailed to Pennsylvania. From there the brothers traveled south to Orange County, Virginia, and settled east of the North Mountain, now known as the Blue Ridge. Little is known of John's and William's lives, but Rockingham County records show that in 1816 James Dean, son of John (who had dropped the "e" from his name), married Susanne Harness. In the early 1820s, Susanne and the couple's two young daughters died in an epidemic, leaving James and his son Jeremiah alone. In 1824 James married his second wife, Sarah Monger, and built a lovely two-story brick house for her in the valley beside Elk Run. The story of how James and Sarah Dean and their children left the valley and lived out their lives on Dean Mountain, now a part of Shenandoah National Park, has been reconstructed from family folklore and records in the family Bible. A fascinating look at life in the mountains before the Park.

Regular price: 10.00
Discounted member price: 8.00
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PC240
Picture of the productShenandoah Heritage: The Story of the People Before the Park
$8.00 for members, $10.00 for non-members. (6th printing, 2000 ) The descendants of the mountain people speak with deep respect of the self-reliance of their forebears. They refer to the stamina, the craftsmanship, the woodlore of these people. They wonder if our modern, "civilized" way of life is really an improvement over that of their ancestors: "Is it progress to make people dissatisfied? To make them want what they don't have?" Shenandoah Heritage is a compiliation of true stories and anecdotes about life in the Blue Ridge before the Park. Written by PATC's only club President who seved two separate terms in office, the book offers a rich view of the "story of the people before the park". Many photographs and many names you'll recognize that now designate mountain hollows and mountains within Shenandoah National Park. A "heritage" book well worth owning.

Regular price: 10.00
Discounted member price: 8.00
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PC250
Picture of the productShenandoah Vestiges: What the Mountain People Left Behind
(5th printing, 2017) This book is mostly photographs of places most visitors to Shenandoah National Park never see - deep in what is now the park backcountry. Pictures are heavily supported by explanatory text and other background information. Much of the park was open field and pasture when the park was established in 1937. As the mountain families moved (or were moved) from their homes, they left behind a fascinating history of old homesites and artifacts. Shenandoah Vestiges explores some of what was left behind - the old homes, implements, even children's toys - with explanations of what the artifacts were, and how they were used by mountain families. The book is 71 pages and includes 73 photographs. Readers are reminded that artifacts should not be removed or disturbed.

Regular price: 10.00
Discounted member price: 8.00
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PC260
Picture of the productShenandoah Secrets: The Story of the Park's Hidden Past
$12.80 for members $16.00 for non-members. (Revised 2011 ) The authors point out significant and interesting events that transpired within what is now the boundaries of the Shenandoah National Park before it was a park. What secrets lie hidden in the Park's forests and briery tangles? What fascinating all-but-forgotten incidents took place inside its boundaries? Today, Shenandoah National Park is, in the words of an old mountain woman, "a play place for city folk." But that was not always the case. Before it was a Park, it was home to nearly 500 families in more than 300 square miles of Virginia countryside — a microcosm of an earlier America. Industry, agriculture, commerce, war with its military actions, political decisions, community, church, and family life—all these have left their mark here. As time passes, these marks grow fainter. The Reeders have kept their memories alive through the words of this book. The authors have collected and published many photographs gleaned from the files of history, some of which were published for the first time. They are candid in their realism and their articulation of life as it was in the past, before the arrival of the artificial "wilderness" created by the formation of the Park. It is many of these same photos that have caused the Park's cultural resource mavens to ban Secrets from being sold in the Park because they depict a period in American history when poverty was prevalent, not only within the confines of current Park boundaries, but in much of rural and urban American. The Depression affected millions of people everywhere, not just in SNP. Within the mountain culture, no one was ashamed to be poor because people cared for each other. No one went hungry. The book's rare and unusual photos depict some of the only interior shots of mountain homes, as well as cabins, schools, mills and other industry, recreation, farm life, animals, and the admirable Appalachian ethics and way of life. Complementing the photos are anecdotes straight from the former inhabitants (some quite humorous), as well as carefully researched events going back to before the founding of the nation. Where possible, these events are tied to the sites where they occurred within the Park, along the roads, the trails, and through the gaps.

Regular price: 16.00
Discounted member price: 12.80
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PC270
Picture of the productPotomac Appalachian Trail Club Cabins - 2016 Edition
$14.40 for members, $18.00 for non-members. The new edition of the Cabins Book is the result of a collaboration of among PATC volunteers and staff. It contains floor plans and interior photographs of each cabin contributed by a team of architects working with the supervisor of facilities. These additions and details such as the sleeping arrangements and the comforts to be found at each cabin give potential renters a feel for what they will experience during their cabin stay.

Regular price: 18.00
Discounted member price: 14.40
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PC280
Picture of the productMemories of a Lewis Mountain Man
$8.00 for members, $10.00 for non-members. (1993) John Stoneberger, who always referred to himself as a "moutaineer and hillbilly", wanted later generations to know about the people who lived in that part of the Blue Ridge Mountains (now part of Shenandoah National Park) where his family had lived during the first third of this century. These are his reminiscences and ancedotes of his family and neighbors, mountain customs (feasts, moonshine, music), the first church, and the first school. Stoneberger beautifully captures a time and place of hard work, simple virtues, and love of mountain life.

Regular price: 10.00
Discounted member price: 8.00
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PC320